Two Poems, and a Review of The Knowledge, in Poetry Salzburg Review

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psr28My copies of Poetry Salzburg Review 28 arrived today, with its signature surrealist cover holding nearly 200 pages of enticing poetry and reviews.

Among them are two new poems from me — “The Computer Programmer’s Wife”, to which I expect many a beleaguered techno-spouse might relate, and the off-kilter Anglophonic lament “Getting On With It”. I am also looking forward to mining out new nuggets from familiar names like Piotr Florcyzik, Kim Moore, and Rob A. Mackenzie.

The review of The Knowledge is a ringing endorsement (I had to sit down) from Ian Watson which concludes, “The problem with The Knowledge is that there are just too many striking images, too many poems to cite. Just go out and buy it.”

Along the way, he points out poems that take up topics that teachers will often advise beginning writers to steer clear from, such as common birds or writers’ block — and notes how these poems succeed, almost defiantly, anyway. He points out my preoccupation with fleeting detail, and calls the work, “erudite, urbane and at times intriguingly evasive.”

If you’re at all intrigued by any of this, you can order your copy of Poetry Salzburg Review 28 directly from their website, or better yet subscribe.

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Five Reviews in Poetry Salzburg Review 26

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Poetry Salzburg Review, Autumn 2014My reviews of five poetry collections appear in the current issue of Poetry Salzburg Review. Each poet, and collection, could not be more different from the next.

American poet Maureen Alsop’s Mantic is a bewitching book of divinations; Irish poet Gene Barry’s Unfinished Business is a humanistic raconteur’s parade; Midlands English poet Helen Calcutt layers deep, meditative imagery in Sudden rainfall; Professor Heger’s Daughter by Southeastern English poet Chrissie Gittins offers a by turns incisive and funny collection of philosophical bon mots; Northern English poet Andrew McMillan’s protest of the physical is a Howl for the post-industrial North.

It was a pleasure to read and review them all.

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Two Poems in Poetry Salzburg Review

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Poetry Salzburg Review No. 22I recently received my contributor’s copy of Poetry Salzburg Review No. 22, containing two of my poems. I have Miriam Halahmy to thank for turning me on to PSR several months ago at a Highgate Poets meeting.

I liken it to a kind of European equivalent of Rattle — brimming with good poems of a sensibility sympatico to my own. I am pleased to have these poems, including one long one, come to light alongside some familiar names, and look forward to poring over the issue.

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